Why Do My Gums Bleed When Flossing?

Do your gums bleed easily when you brush or floss your teeth? It could be because of something simple, like using the wrong technique when you brush or floss. Or, it could be a sign of a health condition you need to check out. Brushing too vigorously, injury, pregnancy, and inflammation can all contribute to bleeding gums. Bleeding gums can also be a sign or periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is more commonly known as gum disease, and typically results from inadequate plaque removal over time.

Causes of Bleeding Gums

Identifying the cause of bleeding gums is key to determining the right treatment method. There are numerous factors that can be the reason for your gums bleeding while brushing or flossing.

  • Gingivitis, a disease that causes inflammation of the gums
  • Brushing too hard or your toothbrush isn’t soft enough
  • Began a flossing routine that your gums aren’t used to yet
  • Taking certain medications, like blood thinners
  • Having inflamed gums because you’re pregnant (pregnancy gingivitis)
  • Dentures that don’t fit well
  • Faulty dental restorations

Tips to Stop Gums From Bleeding

As with most oral health issues, the best way to combat them is by focusing on preventative dental care by following these tips:

  • Practice good oral hygiene by brushing your teeth twice a day and flossing at least once a day.
  • Rinse with hydrogen peroxide after brushing to help reduce gum inflammation
  • Stop smoking. Smoking is a leading cause of gum disease, among putting you at a higher risk for lung cancer, heart disease, or stroke. According to the CDC, smokers are at twice the risk for gum disease, compared to someone who doesn’t smoke.
  • Increase your intake of vitamin C and Vitamin K by eating foods like red peppers, carrots, spinach, and kale.
  • Eat foods with less sugar and carbs. Carbohydrates and sugary goods encourage plaque and growth of bacteria which can accumulate on your gums.

Treatment Options

If you have actively focused on improving you oral health to reduce bleeding gums and haven’t seen improvement after 14 days, it is possible you have periodontal (gum) disease and need to see a dentist. Your dentist office can provide a deep cleaning to remove plaque build up and tartar. Learn more about periodontal disease using the link below, or schedule an appointment with Peak Dental, today.

Learn More About Periodontal Disease Treatment Schedule Online

How To Prevent Cavities & Tooth Decay

Cavities, often referred to as tooth decay, are tiny holes that develop in the hard surface of your teeth. They are most common in children and teenagers, but they can affect everyone including infants and toddlers. Take a closer look at what causes cavities and how you can prevent them.

Causes of Cavities

Cavities typically occur as a result of poor oral health habits but other various factors can increase the risk of getting a cavity, including:

  • Dry mouth. Dry mouth occurs when there is a lack of saliva in the mouth. Saliva helps wash away food stuck on the teeth and it counters the acid produced from bacteria in the mouth, which reduces the chance for cavities.
  • Foods and drinks. Certain foods aren’t as easily washed away from saliva, making them more likely to cause decay. Foods you should limit include: ice cream, honey, sugar, soda, cake, chips, cookies, and hard candy.
  • Constant snacking or sipping. Drinking or eating frequently throughout the day results in increased bacteria in your mouth. This bacteria produce the acids that attack tooth enamel.
  • Lack of fluoride. Fluoride is a natural mineral that helps prevent cavities and can reverse the early stage of tooth decay. Use a fluoride toothpaste and mouthwash to help reduce your chance of cavities.

Cavity Prevention

Regular dental visits and daily brushing and flossing are the best protection against cavities. If you get a cavity, it should be treated right away. But, cavities left untreated get larger and larger, affecting the deeper layers of your teeth. Deeper cavities result in higher chances of experiencing severe toothache and infection. So, when it comes to cavities, prevention is key. Below are some of our cavity preventions tips:

  • Brush with fluoride toothpaste. Brush and floss twice a day, ideally after each meal.
  • Visit your dentist for regularĀ checkups and cleanings. Professional teeth cleanings remove plaque that builds up overtime which isn’t removed by regular brushing and flossing. Going to the dentist twice a year is one of the best cavity prevention options.
  • Dental sealants. Sealants protect the tooth enamel from harmful plaque and bacteria.
Learn More About Fillings and Sealants

What Is The Best Teeth Whitening Option?

Teeth can become discolored for a variety of reasons and many people want their teeth to be bright and white, so they look into teeth whitening. When it comes to getting a brighter smile, you can whiten your teeth at home or get a professional treatment. At home whitening typically includes over-the-counter products like whitening strips, pens, or toothpaste. Professional whitening includes custom-made whitening trays you take home or an in-office appointment. What might work best for some, might not necessarily work best for another. So what’s the best teeth whitening option for you?

Both over-the counter and professional treatments use peroxide bleaching agents as the main active ingredient. The difference between each option is the amount of peroxide it contains. Over-the-counter solutions use 3 – 20 percent where professional solutions contain 14 – 43 percent. Solutions with higher amounts of peroxide should be left on for a shorter amount of time. Keeping the solution on longer will dehydrate your teeth and make them more prone to sensitivity.

Professional Whitening

Professional teeth whitening options are much safer and more effective. Additionally, it ensures that all of the proper precautions are taken. So, when it comes to protecting your gums, the whitening agent only gets on your teeth.

At-Home Whitening Products

Over-the-counter products are cheaper, generally take longer to see results, and have limitations depending on your tooth color and health prior. If used incorrectly, at-home teeth whitening kits can lead to burned gums, tooth sensitivity, or pain. It’s always best to talk with your dentist to decide the best treatment option for you.

If you choose to go for an over-the-counter solution, we recommend that you use one from the list of bleaching products with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Bleaching Products with ADA Seal of Acceptance

 

Learn More About Teeth Whitening